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Köpenick Town Hall is one of a series of neo-Gothic town halls built around the turn of the century in some of Berlin's suburban communities. Köpenick, which had already received municipal law in the Middle Ages, looked back on a long and eventful history of local self-government around 1900.

POSTER Ausstellung Wegen Umbau geschlossen - Das Rathaus Köpenick. Wahrzeichen in Backstein
POSTER Ausstellung Wegen Umbau geschlossen - Das Rathaus Köpenick. Wahrzeichen in Backstein © Museen Treptow-Köpenick, Gestaltung E. Leege, Foto R. Drescher

The rapid industrial development of the region at the end of the 19th century had led to an increase in administration and made it necessary to build a new and modern town hall. To this day, the town hall is a reminder that Köpenick was an independent town until the Greater Berlin Act came into force in 1920. The building became world famous on October 16, 1906, when the "Captain of Köpenick" was played.

With its location on the banks of the Dahme River, Köpenick Town Hall is especially popular with brides and grooms. The inner courtyard is a much-visited venue for concerts and festivals. Thus, the representative town hall is not only a multi-purpose administrative building for the citizens, but also a tourist attraction in the middle of Köpenick's old town.

The exhibition "Closed for Renovation - Köpenick Town Hall. Landmark in Brick" is a cooperation of the Heimatverein Köpenick e. V. and the Museums Treptow-Köpenick.

(Program in German)
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Museum Köpenick