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Spotlighting culture, history, and contemporary events

Berlin’s cultural scene is as diverse as the city itself! Many museums, memorials and exhibitions are especially suitable for wheelchair users. Or they have a selected programme of tours and events for visitors who are partially sighted or blind, or hard of hearing or deaf. And they have much more on offer! Check out our initial overview below.

Berlin’s cultural and arts landscape is appealing, entertaining and inspiring – and above all, world famous. And best of all –it is accessible so everyone can enjoy it! Here, you can become a spy, touch the portrait head of Nefertiti or take a seat in an original GDR living room. All the Berlin museums, memorials, exhibitions and cultural institutions we present here have been evaluated using the Tourism for All quality criteria. You can also obtain detailed information from the Berlin Museum Service +49 30 247 49 888.

Accessible Berlin museums, memorials and arts venues:

Visit Berlin’s accessible museums and memorial sites: First up, some tips on museums and memorials in Berlin. And since these have all been tested under the Tourism for All scheme, you can be sure the information is reliable.

  • Kleisthaus in the heart of the city is home to the offices of the Federal Government Commissioner for Matters relating to Persons with Disabilities.  Over the recent years, this heritage building has developed into an accessible location for performances, readings or exhibitions of disabled and non-disabled artists.
  • The German Historical Museum (DHM), which presents German history in a European context, is accessible for wheelchair users.
  • At the Museum for Natural History, there is step-free access via a wheelchair lift to the exhibition hall showing the world’s largest dinosaur skeleton and an original T-Rex skeleton. 
  • For visitors who are deaf or hard of hearing, the Jewish Museum offers tours in sign language.
  • The wheelchair accessible Museum of Musical Instruments takes you across 500 years of the history of music.
  • As Germany’s main Holocaust Memorial, the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe commemorates the millions of Jewish victims of the Nazi regime. People with limited mobility can take the elevator to the subterranean Information Centre. The permanent exhibition there documents the persecution and destruction of European Jewry as well as the historic sites of the Nazi crimes.
  • The Berlin Wall Memorial at Bernauer Straße is wheelchair accessible.
  • The Topography of Terror exhibition recalls those killed under the Nazi’s euthanasia policies during the Second World War. The webpage also has information in simple language and sign language.
  • The Berlin-Brandenburg Model Park offers a comprehensive overview of Berlin’s sights in miniature. The names of the exhibits are also given  in Braille. The entire site is designed as accessible and has wheelchair accessible toilet facilities.
  • Several times a year, the Bauhaus Archiv offers accessible tours for people who are blind or partially sighted.
  • The me Collectors Room, a private collection owned by the Olbricht family, is also accessible for wheelchair users and people with limited mobility.

 

The following museums and arts venues are not (yet) evaluated under the Tourism for All scheme, but are suitable for wheelchair users.

  • The Philharmonie Berlin: Wheelchair accessible
  • Berliner Ensemble Theatre: Wheelchair spaces
  • Deutsche Oper – Opera House: Wheelchair spaces
  • Staatsoper Berlin – Opera House Wheelchair spaces
  • Komische Oper Berlin - Opera House: Wheelchair spaces
  • Friedrichstadt-Palast: Wheelchair accessible
  • Wintergarten Varieté Theatre: Wheelchair accessible