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Neuer Pavillon im Schlosspark Charlottenburg
Neuer Pavillon im Schlosspark Charlottenburg © SPSG / Foto: Wolfgang Pfauder

Jewel of the Schinkel era

The "star architect" of Prussia, Karl Friedrich Schinkel, was commissioned by Frederick William III., to build the two-storey summer house in the immediate vicinity of Charlottenburg Palace.

Address
Neuer Pavillon im Schlosspark Charlottenburg

Spandauer Damm 24 14059  Berlin


After the king's death in 1840, the pavilion was no longer inhabited. Parts of the library were temporarily housed here; in 1938 it became a museum. In 1943, the building burned down to the brickwork; the furnishings were also extensively destroyed. The reconstruction in 1957-60 was carried out according to original plans. In 1970, the reconstruction of the decorative interior decoration was largely completed; the museum was open to the public again. For more than 30 years, the New Pavilion has presented masterpieces from the Schinkel period: paintings of Romanticism and the Biedermeier by Caspar David Friedrich, Carl Blechen, Eduard Gaertner and Karl Friedrich Schinkel as well as furnishings, sculptures, porcelain and Berlin cast iron of the early 19th century. The new permanent exhibition, which will be on view from 4 December, is a continuation of this trend. On the ground floor, the Spatial Art of the Schinkel period can be experienced again in three rooms. Part of the interior of the building has been preserved, lost works of art are replaced by comparable objects. Thanks to a donation from the friends of the Prussian castles and gardens, a Schinkel chair was purchased. The remaining exhibition rooms on the ground floor are devoted to various themes of early 19th century art: Romantic reception of the Middle Ages, Berlin veduta painting and portrait art in painting and sculpture. On the upper floor, the new permanent exhibition concentrates increasingly on the work of Karl Friedrich Schinkel. His outstanding achievements in architecture, painting and his multifaceted, highly influential design activities, including for iron art casting and furniture, are illuminated. A second focal point is a presentation of major works of early 19th century painting. Finally they are back in public, the "Tomorrow in the Giant Mountains" and the "Harbour" of Caspar David Friedrich, Eduard Gaertner's views from Berlin, Moscow and Paris as well as Carl Blechen's "Ruins at the Gulf of Naples".

Event calendar

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