Memorials

Memorials

Berlin's history left its traces in the city and the cityscape. Diverse memorials commemorate Worldwar I and II as well as the era of the cold war. Berlin's history is still fascinating, contrary to the trend in the rest of Germany, memorials are attracting each year growing numbers of visitors.

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The Anne Frank Center, the German partner organisation of Anne Frank House in Amsterdam, is located directly adjacent to the Hackesche Höfe in Berlin’s Mitte district....
The Anti-War Museum presents historical facts on the topics of war and peace, and features an original air raid shelter from World War II. The privately operated museum...
Between the Hakescher Markt and Alexanderplatz runs Rosenstraße, which together with the Heidereutergasse provides the boundary of a small park in the Marienviertel of...
If you are walking from the boulevard Unter den Linden to the Bebelplatz, you will probably see people who watch together on a spot on the floor. Only on closer...
The German-Russian Museum was officially opened on May 10th, 1995, the fiftieth anniversary of the end of the war in Europe. It is meant as a memorial of the German-...
The area of today’s memorial site Sachsenhausen was one of the largest concentration camps of the Reich between 1936 and 1945. During that time, there and in various sub...
The historical tour is a system providing historical information within the city. It consists of 30 signs which are distributed between 14 different points throughout...
On 20th January 1942 a fateful meeting of high officials from the Nazi Ministries and the SS was held in the Minoux villa by the Wannsee waterside. Under the direction...
The Memorial to the German Resistance at the Bendlerblock building complex commemorates German resistance against National Socialism. The centre of the memorial is an...
The memorial was designed by the Danish-Norwegian artists Michael Elmgreen and Ingar Dragset and was inaugurated on May 27th 2008. The 3.60-meter high and 1.90-meter...

Five minutes’ walking distance from Alexanderplatz. Huge hand-painted film posters hang on the sandstone façade of the postmodern building from the 60’s. Though its architecture is striking from the outside, the building’s most impressive features are found inside. With its magnificent chandeliers, retro eastern European style, red armchairs and huge glass front, the cinema’s foyer is a highlight in itself. Be it premieres or gay parties, this cinema hosts all sorts of events where glamorous VIPs mix with students, film lovers and party people.