Skip to main content

What do a sculpture fragment, an oil painting, and a drawer full of broken glass have in common? They are incomplete in different ways. The exhibition, curated by the volunteers of the National Museums in Berlin, shows that this is not always apparent at first glance.

Fragment. Der Reiz des Unvollständigen , 29.9.22-8.1.23, Kunstbibliothek: Wilhelm Lehmbruck, Knieende (Fragment), Gesicht, 1911
Fragment. Der Reiz des Unvollständigen , 29.9.22-8.1.23, Kunstbibliothek: Wilhelm Lehmbruck, Knieende (Fragment), Gesicht, 1911 Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Nationalgalerie / Andres Kilger


In a presentation that spans collections, genres, and epochs, the objects take center stage. Their stories are diverse, worth telling - and sometimes as incomplete as the condition of the objects themselves. They tell of destruction and decay, but also of research and insight.


In the form of critical interventions, the museum as an institution is also questioned: What is actually included in a collection, from which context is it removed for this purpose, and what is ultimately presented to the public? The appeal of the incomplete also lies in its uncertainty. Where certainty is missing, there is room for imagination and creativity, for dialogue and debate.