Government Quarter

Government Quarter

Political buildings

Marie-Elisabeth-Lüders-Haus – © Pierre Adenis

After the old diplomatic district laid idle for decades following the war, international life moved back in after the fall of the Wall: from A like Austria to C like Cyprus. A walk through the district takes one from the Pariser Platz to the Austrien Embassy, India’s, Egypt’s and South Africa’s, as well as the state representatives of Baden-Württemberg and Nordrhein-Westfalen. Thereto, in the Tiergarten triangle a new “city in the city” has come into being: next to the CDU Federal Office and many luxury apartments, there are also the five Nordic Embassies in a building ensemble to come across, which is encased by an enormous copper band.
From the “Wohnschlange” to the Moabiter Werder over to the Office of the Federal President up to the enterable Reichstag dome: the Berliner’s must also still familiarise themselves to some of the names and places of the government district. And yet, 20 years after the fall of the Wall it is clear: the government is back in Berlin again.
The skyline over Berlin is already impossible to imagine without the glass dome of the Berliner Reichstag, which was extensively modified and rehabilitated by the English architect Sir Norman Foster. The 1884 until 1894 duration of construction by the architect Paul Wallots is a mirror of German history. The history is also adopted by the architects Axel Schulte and Charlotte Frank’s urban planning overall concept, “bond of the federation”.